PST Psychosomatic Therapy

Upcoming seminar: 12th, 13th and 14th of June, 2020 in Madrid

Psychosomatic Therapy (PST) involves the release of body tissue (muscles, ligaments, organs and fascia) at the moment that the therapist makes contact with the areas in the body that are most restricted using gentle and respectful manual palpation.

During the therapy, emotional release frequently takes place in the areas that are most restricted due to the fact that body tissue has the capacity to memorize emotional states that develop in a situation of conflict.

PST is a therapeutic process that frees the mind and body of the effects of physical, mental and chemical trauma.

Dr. John Upledger and the biophysicist Zvi Karni discovered that the body retains energy and isolates it in what they identify as an “Energy Cyst”, which is an area of disorganized cells where residual energy has been introduced into the body through physical and/or emotional trauma. Infectious processes, exposure to radiation and toxic substances can contribute to the appearance of this cyst.

The releasing process is activated when the patient’s body is placed in the same position as when they received the impact. At the moment in which the patient is in the correct position, signs appear to indicate that the process has begun. Based on tissue behavior, and incorporating therapeutic dialogue with patient when required, body positions will be adapted until the Energy Cyst is released.

At all times, the therapist will maintain respectful contact with the patient by avoiding any type of judgment.

Once the cyst has dissolved, the symptoms associated with it may disappear immediately or gradually, depending, above all, on the time is has been present and its quality.

CONTENTS

  • Energy Cyst.
  • The Path of Expression.
  • Initiating the Process.
  • Tests, Distractions and Evasion.
  • The Releasing Process.
  • Signs of Release, Interruptions in the Process and Unwinding.
  • Difference between Energy Cyst Release and PST.
  • Precautions Before the Process.
  • Images and Therapeutic Dialogue.
  • Unsolicited Images.
  • Requested Images.
  • Useful Tools.
  • Resistance.
  • Patient-Therapist Relationship.
  • Past Lives and Resolution.